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Population growth and its impacts on nature and natural resources

Population growth and its impacts – complete detail. Population growth and its impacts on nature and natural resources. The geometric rise in human population levels during the twentieth century is the fundamental cause of the loss of biodiversity.
Nature and natural resources are destroyed as human populations grow. Nature and natural resources are destroyed as human populations grow and require more space for habitation and farming, and more fuel for cooking. Demand for cultivable land, fuel wood/charcoal and other forest products, arising from the needs of the non-agricultural (mostly, urban) population and the export sector.
Population growth is less important a factor here: income growth and the technological factor play a much greater role in this case than in the preceding one. In this context, a national policy of limiting population growth probably has a limited effect. Demand for forest products from non-agricultural sectors (industries, mining etc., including through export channels). The role of population growth as a determinant of growth in demand is even weaker in this case; technological…………

Population growth is responsible for degradation of nature and natural resources. Population growth has become a major force behind nature degradation in many rural and urban environments. The equality of the environment is constantly losing its status due to increase in population growth in most countries of world. Environmental degradation is a situation where the environment loses its natural equilibrium. Population has been a chief agent of environmental degradation in most cities of the world. He further explain that man main occupations were hunting and gathering of fruits but later as human population increased, man invented new techniques which has constitute great menace to the natural environment. population growth in these communities have lead to increasing environmental problems such as loss of plant and animal species, pollution, air population, soil infertility among others.

Nature and natural resources are destroyed as human populations grow and require more space for habitation and farming, and more fuel for cooking. In many cases the local people lost their traditional power over the groves, and their groves have been opened up to commercial forestry.

All world facing deforestation and environmental degradation as the population grows, and with it the demand for space and resources. Much of the original vegetation in many places has been cleared, and sacred groves remain as refuges for plants and animals. However, even the sacred groves are being encroached upon as demand for space and resources increases. Demand for cultivable land, fuel wood and other forest products, for the needs of a growing agricultural population. In this context, it may often be true that “policies to slow down population growth and enhance alternative employment opportunities are a necessary complement to strategies to attain sustainable agricultural development”. There is some uncertainty; however, as to how much national policies of this kind actually influence the growth of rural populations, especially those living in subsistence agriculture, because those populations typically are those who benefit the least from reproductive health services.

Demand for cultivable land, fuel wood/charcoal and other forest products, arising from the needs of the non-agricultural (mostly, urban) population and the export sector. Population growth is less important a factor here: income growth and the technological factor play a much greater role in this case than in the preceding one. In this context, a national policy of limiting population growth probably has a limited effect. Demand for forest products from non-agricultural sectors (industries, mining etc., including through export channels). The role of population growth as a determinant of growth in demand is even weaker in this case; technological change and policies can carry far greater weight than demographic change. Therefore, population growth policies probably have a negligible impact on this component.

The geometric rise in human population levels during the twentieth century is the fundamental cause of the loss of biodiversity. It has led to an unceasing search for more arable land for food production and livestock grazing, and for wood for fuel, construction, and energy. Previously undisturbed areas (which may or may not be suitable for the purposes to which they are constrained) are being transformed into agricultural or pasture land, stripped of wood, or mined for resources to support the energy needs of an ever-growing human population. Humans also tend to settle in areas of high biodiversity, which often have relatively rich soils and other attractions for human activities. This leads to great threats to biodiversity, especially since many of these areas have numerous endemic species.

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