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Hunting and poaching – complete detail

Hunting and poaching – complete detail. what is poaching. Definition of poaching. Hunting and poaching of wildlife. Effects of Hunting and poaching of wildlife. Many patches which appear intact are in fact “empty forests,” since most large animals have been hunted to unsustainable levels.
These animals are mainly hunted for meat, but also for skins (jaguar, ocelot) or medicinal/chemical properties (poison-arrow frogs, collected to provide poisons for arrow tips, and the midwife toad, which in the Amazon is thought to have medicinal value).
Turtles are heavily harvested for meat and their eggs are collected for food almost everywhere in the tropics and subtropics. Asian tropical freshwater turtles are in serious decline because they are extensively hunted for food or for use in traditional Chinese medicines……….
Hunting and poaching of wildlife is the serious problem for nature. Specific threats to certain animals are related to large economic benefits. Tigers, bears, deer, snakes, and many other animals are near extinction in many places because of this trade.

Introduction

Poaching is the illegal hunting, killing and capturing of wild animals. People poach animals for their products, such as hide, ivory, horn, teeth and bone. Large mammals such as the tiger, rhinoceros, lion and elephant once faced the distinct possibility of complete extinction due to rampant hunting and poaching.

Hunting and poaching of wildlife is the serious problem for nature. Specific threats to certain animals are related to large economic benefits. Skin and bones from tigers, ivory from elephants, horns from rhinos and the perfume from the must deer are extensively used abroad. Bears are killed for their skin and other body parts. Corals and shells are also collected for export or sold on the beaches of Chennai and Kanyakumari. A variety of wild plants are over harvested because they have unique medicinal value. The commonly collected plants include Rauvolfia, Nuxvomica, Datura, etc. Collection of garden plants includes orchids, ferns and moss. Poaching is perhaps the most obvious direct cause of extinction in animals, but it is undoubtedly far less important than the indirect causes of habitat modification in terms of overall loss of biodiversity. Hunting selectively affects the targeted species, as well as plant and animal species whose populations are subsequently affected either negatively or positively, and so it has important implications for the management of natural resources. Genetic diversity in a hunted population is liable to decrease as a result of the same factors. The genetic diversity represented by populations of crop plants or livestock is also likely to decline as a result of mass production, for the desired economics of scale demand high levels of uniformity.

Many patches which appear intact are in fact “empty forests,” since most large animals have been hunted to unsustainable levels. These animals are mainly hunted for meat, but also for skins (jaguar, ocelot) or medicinal/chemical properties (poison-arrow frogs, collected to provide poisons for arrow tips, and the midwife toad, which in the Amazon is thought to have medicinal value). Turtles are heavily harvested for meat and their eggs are collected for food almost everywhere in the tropics and subtropics. Asian tropical freshwater turtles are in serious decline because they are extensively hunted for food or for use in traditional Chinese medicines. Thousands of tons of live turtles are caught or sent to China annually, a completely unsustainable level of collection. Some of the hunting is done for subsistence purposes by villagers; some by farmers, miners and loggers, who live in the forest and use forest animals as a major food source; some by commercial hunters to supply urban markets. This is a major source of income in many rural tropical areas. Over-exploitation of wildlife resources, then, lies with improving the income levels of local residents (so bush meat becomes less attractive as a protein source), in increasing the costs of hunting, and in lowering the prices of alternative protein sources.

Many animals are trapped for the pet trade (tropical fish, birds, reptiles, monkeys) or for zoos or medical research. A 25-week survey of the Bangkok weekend market found specimens of 225 species of birds (most “protected” by government decree) for sale. Other animals are trapped for their hides or furs, and some are killed because they live too close to human habitation and impinge on human activities. Many tropical animals are hunted mercilessly for their value in traditional Asian medicines. Tigers, bears, deer, snakes, and many other animals are near extinction in many places because of this trade. Why do people heedlessly decimate the precious biodiversity of their planet? Some of them feel they have no economic alternative, while others are driven by the desire for short-term profit. Still others are uncomprehending. Unfortunately, so much of the depredation which is being inflicted upon areas of great biodiversity is, in the long run, and often in the short run, in vain.

About Vijay Choudhary

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