Breaking News
Home » Fauna » Birds » Green bee eater (Merops orientalis) complete detail – updated

Green bee eater (Merops orientalis) complete detail – updated

Green bee eater (Merops orientalis) complete detail – updated. Description of Green bee eater (Merops orientalis). Local name – Bahira popat. Classification of Green bee eater (Merops orientalis). Habit and habitat of Green bee eater (Merops orientalis). The little green bee-eater predominantly inhabits arid woodlands with scattered trees and bare soil or sand.
The green bee eater is mostly bronze-green, with golden-green crown and nape, black eye line, pale bluish-green cheeks, chin and throat, and narrow black half-collar between throat and breast. They have curved and long beaks that end in a sharp point. Their sharp claws enable them to perch on vertical surfaces and are also helpful when excavating nesting tunnels. Sexes generally look alike, although in some species the males have red irises while the females’ are brown-red. In other species, the tail-streamers of the male are slightly longer than the females………..
Green bee-eaters are omnivorous. They predominantly inhabits arid woodlands. Breeding season varies from March to June and sometimes from July to to August according to the range. Breeding pairs nest in long, vertical nesting burrows that they themselves excavated in earth or sand banks, such as river banks or sand quarries.

126127

Click here to view State wise list of Indian state birds (symbols) – updated

Description

Local name of Green bee eater is Bahira Popat. Size of Green bee eater is between 16 cm to 19 cm including the tail and Wingspan is between 46 cm to 49 cm. The Weight of adult is between 16 g. to 25 g. The green bee eater is mostly bronze-green, with golden-green crown and nape, black eye line, pale bluish-green cheeks, chin and throat, and narrow black half-collar between throat and breast.  Eyes are deep red. Legs and feet are blackish. The green bee eater has bright green plumage and attractive long tail-feathers and also has a long, but sharp and narrow black beak which is perfectly designed for catching flying insects.

Female is similar to male, but she has shorter streamers, duller throat and narrower half collar. The green bee eater has two central, long, narrow, black tail streamers. The wings are largely green, sometimes tinted with gold or reddish-brown, and have a black trailing edge. The crown may be green, or may be strongly tinged with reddish-brown and the bill is long and black.

They have curved and long beaks that end in a sharp point. Their sharp claws enable them to perch on vertical surfaces and are also helpful when excavating nesting tunnels. Sexes generally look alike, although in some species the males have red irises while the females’ are brown-red. In other species, the tail-streamers of the male are slightly longer than the females.

128129

Classification

Common Name – Green bee eater

Local Name – Bahiraa Popat

Zoological Name – Merops orientalis

Kingdom – Animalia

Phylum – Chordata

Class – Aves

Order – Coraciiformes

Family – Meropidae

Genus – Merops

Conservational Status – Schedule – IV, according to wildlife (Protection) act, 1972 and classified as Least Concern (LC) by the IUCN.

Distribution

The little green bee-eater has a vast range, stretching from Mauritania in West Africa, across sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent as far north as Nepal. Its range extends into Southeast Asia, from central China, south to Thailand and Vietnam.

The little green bee-eater, resident in a belt across sub-Saharan Africa from Senegal and The Gambia to Ethiopia, the Nile valley, western Arabia and Asia through India to Vietnam. It also performs post-breeding dispersions and some altitudinal migrations, according to the range.  It is more resident in Israel and Egypt.

.22.23

Habit and habitat

The little green bee-eater predominantly inhabits arid woodlands with scattered trees and bare soil or sand. The little green bee-eater can also be found in thickets around crops, near streams, shores, in plantations, palms, dunes, on lakesides or in dry river beds, as well as in open ground such as overgrazed pastures, gardens and farmland.

The green bee-eater is also known to sand-bathe more frequently than other bee-eater species and will sometimes bathe in water by dipping into water in flight.

The green bee-eater is an omnivorous bird. The green bee-eater primarily feeds on insects mostly honeybees and other flying insects, green bee-eater also eat fruits and berries. Green Bee-eater feeds on Hymenoptera, bugs, termites, beetles, moths and a lot of flies. It also consumes some butterflies, crickets, dragonflies, spiders and caterpillars.

Click here to view State wise list of Indian state animals (symbols) – updated

Green Bee-eater is usually less gregarious than other bee-eaters. Green bee-eaters are usually seen in small groups. They sleep in flocks at roosts, perched high in trees. Outside the night, this bird perches fairly low. It hunts from a perch, fence and small thorny tree. Green Bee-eater has agile flight. It sallies low from the ground into vegetation in order to catch preys.

Bee-eaters are colony nesters that typically breed in open country in warmer climates. Breeding season varies from March to June and sometimes from July to August according to the range. Breeding pairs nest in long, vertical nesting burrows that they themselves excavated in earth or sand banks, such as river banks or sand quarries. The tunnels are usually at least 2 – 3 feet deep and terminate in a nest chamber. Females lay an average of 4 to 7 small, glossy, white eggs. Incubation lasts about 17 to 23 days, mainly by female. Young remain at nest during 21 to 32 days and they are fed by both parents. Both parents share the incubation tasks and raising of the chicks. The young leave the nest but parents will continue to feed them for a while after fledging as the young have to learn to catch insects on the wing and to handle stinging insects.

About Vijay Choudhary

Check Also

Bay backed shrike (Lanius vittatus) complete detail – updated

Bay backed shrike (Lanius vittatus) complete detail – updated. Description of Bay backed shrike (Lanius …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.